July 9 - 13, 2015
Exhibitor listing
  • Shona - Dan Christensen
  • Hero on the Rocks -

Berry Campbell Gallery


530 W 24th Street
New York, New York 10011
United States
T  212.924.2178
info@berrycampbell.com
www.berrycampbell.com
E-mail address : cb@berrycampbell.com
Website : http://www.berrycampbell.com
 

Exhibitor's Artists:

Richard Anuszkiewicz




Edward Avedisian
Biography :
An artist who mixed the hot colors of Pop Art with the cool, more analytical qualities of Color Field painting, Edward Avedisian was among the leading figures to emerge in the New York art world in the 1960s. Along with his contemporaries, including Jules Olitski, Kenneth Noland, Walter Darby Bannard, Dan Christensen, Ron Davis, and Larry Poons, he was instrumental in the exploration of new abstract methods to explore the primacy of optical experience, breaking from the tactility of Abstract Expressionism. He was included in the landmark exhibitions, Op Art: The Responsive Eye, held at the Museum of Modern Art in 1965, and Expo 67, held in Montreal. He showed at the prominent Hansa (1958-59) and Elkon (1960-75) galleries and participated in four annuals at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Through the early 1970s, works such as his “beach balls,” “seedlike orbs,” and “stripes with splashes” were prominently featured in Artforum (including the magazine’s cover in January 1969), Artnews, and Arts magazines. After leaving New York City in the mid-1970s for Hudson, New York, he shifted his attention to figurative images, painting his surroundings in an expressionist style compared by critics to the work of the Fauves, Marsden Hartley, and Paula Modersohn-Becker. In the 1970s, he created colorful abstract sculptures out of Styrofoam. Avedisian was born in Lowell, Massachusetts and attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. His first exhibition was in 1957, at the Boylston Print Center Gallery, Cambridge, Massachusetts. After moving to New York City in about that time, he joined the dynamic art scene in Greenwich Village, frequenting the Cedar Tavern on Tenth Street, associating with the critic Clement Greenberg, and joining a new generation of abstract artists who were exploring the limits and possibilities of art by experimenting with new techniques and ways of organizing pictorial space. In 1958, he was the last new member invited Exhibition :
Born, 1936 Lowell, Massachusetts
Boston Museum School
1969, University of Kansas, Artist-in-Residence
1970, School of Visual Arts, NY, Artist-in-Residence
1972, University of California, Irvine, Artist-in-Residence
1973, University of California, Los Angeles, Artist-in-Residence
Died, 2007 Hudson, NY
AWARDS
1967, Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship
1968, National Council of the Arts Award
SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Hoylston Print Center Gallery, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1957.
Tibor de Nagy, New York, 1957.
Hansa Gallery, New York, 1958.
Tibor de Nagy, New York, 1959.
Tibor de Nagy, New York, 1960.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1962.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1963.
Galerie Ziegler, Zurich, Switzerland, 1964.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1964.
Kasmin Limited, London, 1965.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, California, 1965.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1965.
1966 Kasmin Limited, London, 1966.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, California, 1966.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1966.
Kasmin Limited, London, 1967.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1967.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, California, 1968.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1968.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, 1969.
Bucknell University Art Gallery, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, 1970.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1970.
Jack Glenn Gallery, Corona del Mar, California, 1971.
Walter Moos Gallery, Toronto, 1971.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1971.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1972.
Janie C. Lee Gallery, Houston, Texas, 1974.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1974.
The Carriage House, Buffalo, New York, 1975.
Robert Elkon Gallery, New York, 1975.
Gray Art Gallery, New York, 1977.
The Carriage House, New York, 1978.
Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, New York, 1978.
Fishbach Gallery, New York, 1979.
Jason McCoy Inc., New York, 1984.
Carrie Haddad Gallery, Hudson, New York, 1995.
Mitchell Algus, New York, 1996.
Mitchell Algus, New York, 1999.


Walter Darby Bannard
Biography :
A leading figure in the development of Color Field Painting in the late 1950s and an important American abstract painter, Walter Darby Bannard (better known as Darby Bannard) has been committed to color-based and expressionist abstraction for over five decades. During his undergraduate years at Princeton University, he joined fellow students, the painter Frank Stella and the critic and art historian Michael Fried, in conversations that expanded aesthetic definitions and led to an emphasis on opticality as the defining feature of pictorial art. Bannard has continued to explore attributes of color, paint, and surface through innovative methods, striving throughout his career for vital and original expressive means. He has also been an important writer on formalist issues in art, serving as an editor for Artforum and a contributor to Art International. His extensive publications date from the 1960s to the present. In the early 1990s, Bannard moved to Miami. He currently serves as professor and head of painting at the University of Miami, Coral Gables. Bannard was born in 1934 in New Haven, Connecticut. He attended Phillips Exeter Academy and graduated from Princeton University in 1956. Bannard, who made drawings and watercolors throughout his youth, was self-taught as a painter. He derived inspiration for his earliest paintings from the art of William Baziotes, Theodoros Stamos, and Clyfford Still. By the late 1950s, he had turned from an expressionistic style to working with large areas of contrasting color, creating austere minimal paintings. In the next decade, he was one of the first artists to blend artist’s materials with commercially produced tinted alkyd resin house paints in a search for greater color options. In 1964, he was included in the landmark exhibition, Post-Painterly Abstraction, organized by Clement Greenberg and held at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. His first solo exhibitions were in 1965, at Kasim Gallery, London; Richard F Exhibition :
Born, 1934 New Haven, Connecticut
1956, Princeton University
1983, National Endowment for the Arts, Invitational Residency

AWARDS
1968, Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship
1968, National Foundation of the Arts Award
1981, Distinguished Classmate Award, Princeton University Class of 1956
1986, Francis J. Greenburger Foundation Award
1991, Richard A. Florsheim Art Fund Grant

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Kasmin Gallery, London, 1965.
Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago, 1965.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York 1965.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1966.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, 1967.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1967.
Kasmin Gallery, London, 1968.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1968.
Bennington College, Vermont, 1969.
David Mirvish Gallery, Toronto, 1969.
David Mirvish Gallery, Toronto, 1970.
Joseph Helman Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri, 1970.
Kasmin Gallery, London, 1970.
Lawrence Rubin Gallery, New York, 1970.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1970.
Neuendorf Gallery, Cologne, Germany, 1971.
Kasmin Gallery, London, 1972.
Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach, California, 1972.
Lawrence Rubin Gallery, New York, 1972.
Baltimore Museum of Art (High Museum, Atlanta, Georgia; Houston Museum of Art, Texas) 1973.
Lawrence Rubin Gallery, New York, 1973.
Pasadena Art Museum, 1973.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1974.
David Mirvish Gallery, Toronto, 1975.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1975.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1976.
Greenberg Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri, 1977.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1977.
Lamont Gallery, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, 1977.
David Mirvish Gallery, Toronto, 1978.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1978.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1979.
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 1979.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1980.
Ulrich Art Museum, Wichita State University, 1980.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New York, 1981.
Knoedler Contemporary Art, New Yo


Frank Bowling

Exhibition :
1936, born Bartica, Essequibo, British Guiana
1959, Regent Street Polytechnic, Chelsea School of Art, London
1962, MFA, Royal College of Art, London (silver medal)
Lives in both London and Brooklyn, New York

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Grabowski Gallery, London, 1962.
Grabowski Gallery, London, 1963.
Terry Dintenfass, New York, 1966.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1971.
Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 1973.
Gallery Center for Inter-American Relations, New York, 1973 – 74.
Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 1974.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1975.
William Darby Gallery, London, 1976.
Watson/de Nagy and Company, Houston, 1976.
William Darby Gallery, London, 1977.
Acme Gallery, London, Selected Paintings 1976-77, 1977.
Polytechnic Art Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, Frank Bowling Retrospective, 1978.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1979.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1980.
Vecu, Antwerp, Belgium, 1981.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1982.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1983.
Arcade Gallery, Harrogate, England, 1986.
Serpentine Gallery, London, 1986.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1986.
Castlefield Gallery, Manchester, England, 1988.
Crawford Art Gallery, Cork, Ireland, 1988.
Municipal Art Gallery, Limerick, Ireland, 1988.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1989.
University Art Gallery, Reading, England, Bowling Through the Decade, 1989.
The Royal West of England Academy, Bristol, 1990.
Wilmer Jennings at Kenkeleba, New York, 1991.
Heimatmuseum, Eckernforde, Schleswig Hoistein, Germany, 1993.
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, 1993.
Bill Hodges Gallery, New York, 1995.
The Cut Gallery, London, 1995.
Leicester City Gallery, Leicester, England (traveled to six various locations), Bowling Through the Century, 1996 .
Camille Love Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, 1997.
Center for Art & Culture, Skylight Gallery, Brooklyn, 1997.
Christiane Nienaber Gallery, New York, 1997.
The Cut Gallery, London, 1997.
DE


Stanley Boxer
Biography :
Throughout his four-decade-long career, Stanley Boxer broke through the barriers that often divided the artists of his day. In the 1960s, he was deemed a Color Field Painter, but at the time he was already moving toward the material specificity of process art, building dense surfaces with unexpected additives, such as sand, glitter, sawdust, wood shavings, and dressmaker’s beads. However, Boxer stopped short of letting his materials speak for themselves. More interested in the end result than in his process or materials, in his art, he expressed his love for intense optical experiences in their own right. Rather than literalist statements, he sought to create new forms that could excite the eye. Boxer found a meeting ground among the competing ideologies of his time, while maintaining his distinctive artistic identity. His paintings, sculpture, collages, and prints can be linked to contemporary currents, but throughout he maintained a commitment to creating surfaces characterized by intense radiance and nuance, designed with “a kind of choreography of material,” as described in Arts Magazine by Judith Van Baren in 1974. It is interesting to read the substantial body of criticism of Boxer’s work for its conflicting viewpoints. To some critics, Boxer demonstrated minimalist tendencies—in his striving for directness, for example. To others, he was gargantuan in his inclusiveness—incorporating into his work anything he could get his hands on. Whereas one critic described his art as demonstrating a luminosity that evokes a “tranquil, almost spiritual” quality, another related his work to the drama of Baroque art, in the way that he was drawing with color, using strokes that “built up to a pictorial climax.” Some commentators observed the contradictions. Karen Wilkin described Boxer’s works as “at once lyrical and brutal.” In 2004, Grace Glueck wrote in the New York Times that Boxer’s paintings could be “read as landscapes as well as e Exhibition :
Born, 1926 New York
Died, 2000 New York

AWARDS
1975, Guggenheim Fellowship
1989, National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artist Grant
1992, Elected to the National Academy of Design
1993, Elected to National Academy of Design as Full Member
1997, Print Club of New York Print Commission
2004, Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement & Contribution to the Cultural Life of Columbia County

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Perdalma Gallery, New York, 1953.
Perdalma Gallery, New York, 1954.
Perdalma Gallery, New York, 1955.
Grand Central Moderns Gallery, New York, 1965.
University of Manitoba, Canada, Western Canadian Art Circuit, 1967.
Loeb Center, New York University, 1968.
Rose Fried Gallery, New York, 1968.
University of Manitoba, Canada, Western Canadian Art Circuit, 1968.
Rose Fried Gallery, New York, 1969.
University of Manitoba, Canada, Western Canadian Art Circuit, 1969.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1971.
Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, Long Island, New York, 1972.
Santa Barbara Museum, Santa Barbara, California, 1972.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1972.
Tom Bortolazzo Gallery, Santa Barbara, California, 1972.
Galerie Karl Flinker, Paris, 1973.
Lubin House, Syracuse University, New York, 1973.
McNay Museum, San Antonio, Texas, 1973.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1973.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1974.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery (Watson/de Nagy & Co.), Houston, Texas, 1974.
André Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1975.
Beaumont Museum, Beaumont, Texas, 1975.
Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York, 1975.
Galerie André Emmerich, Zurich, Switzerland, 1975.
Galerie Wentzel, Hamburg, Germany, 1975.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1975.
André Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1976.
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1976.
Watson/de Nagy & Co., Houston, Texas, 1976.
André Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1977.
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, 1977.
Edmonton Art Gallery Museum, Edmonton, Canada, 19


Also exhibited by: SPONDER GALLERY,
James Brooks




James Brooks




Dan Christensen
Biography :
Dan Christensen (1942-2007) was a leading figure in the Color Field movement whose relentless experimentation with new tools and materials made him among the most ambitious abstract and gestural artists of his time. In the late 1960s, Dan Christensen’s art was championed by important curators, critics, and art dealers, and important paintings were placed in major museum collections around the United States. However, it is only recently that his multifaceted oeuvre has received the widespread attention it has long deserved. The traveling retrospective, Dan Christensen: Forty Years of Painting, organized by the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art (Kansas City, Missouri) in 2009, helped make a convincing case for a heightened appreciation of Christensen’s work and his significant place in postwar abstraction. In a day when artists often held to a specific type of form, Christensen changed his approach and aesthetic often, at times in dramatic reversals and at other times in a return to and an expansion of earlier themes. His use of spray guns, window-washing squeegees, rakes, blasters, and house painting rollers were not the basis of his art but the vehicles that enabled him to strive for new ways of seeing. As noted in a review in Artforum of his Kemper show, the critic Peter Plagens observed that with his gutsy combination of elements, Christensen arrived “at some sort of visual poetry.” Dan Christensen was born in Cozad, Nebraska in 1942. Seeing the work of Jackson Pollock on a trip to Denver when he was teenager motivated him to become an artist. He pursued this aim at the Kansas City Art Institute, Missouri, where he received his B.F.A. After moving to New York in 1964, he rose quickly to fame, as among a group of young artists who were reviving painting during a time that minimalism was prevalent. Christensen first gained renown for his spray loop paintings, in which he used the spray gun to create repeating calligraphic circles, producing Exhibition :
1942, born Cozad, Nebraska
2007, died East Hampton, New York
1964, BFA, Kansas City Art Institute, Missouri

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 1967.
Galerie Ricke, Cologne, Germany, 1968.
Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 1968.
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1969.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, 1970.
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1971.
Galerie Ricke, Cologne, Germany, 1971.
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1972.
Nicholas Wilder Gallery, Los Angeles, 1972.
Edmonton Art Gallery, Edmonton, Alberta, 1973.
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1974.
Greenberg Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri, 1974.
Jared Sable Gallery, Toronto, Ontario, 1974.
Rothman’s Art Gallery, Stratford, Ontario, 1974.
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1975.
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1976.
Douglas Drake Gallery, New York, Kansas City, Missouri, 1976.
Watson/ de Nagy Gallery, Houston, 1976.
B.R. Kornblatt Gallery, Baltimore, Maryland, 1977.
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, 1978.
Gloria Luria Gallery, Miami, 1978.
Meredith Long Contemporary Gallery, New York, 1978.
Meredith Long Gallery, Houston, 1978.
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, 1979.
Meredith Long Gallery, Houston, 1979.
Meredith Long Gallery, New York, 1979.
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, 1980.
Meredith Long Gallery, Houston, 1980.
Meredith Long Gallery, New York, 1980.
University of Nebraska, Omaha, 1980.
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, 1981.
Gallery 700, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1981.
Gloria Luria Gallery, Miami, 1981.
Harcus Krakow Gallery, Boston, 1981.
Meredith Long and Company, Houston, 1981.
Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, Inc., New York, 1981.
Douglas Drake Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, 1982.
Ivory/Klimpton Gallery, San Francisco, 1982.
Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, Inc, New York, 1982.
Carson-Sapiro Gallery, Denver, Colorado, 1983.
Lincoln Center Gallery, New York, 1983.
Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, I


Dan Christensen - Shona
Shona
Also exhibited by: SPONDER GALLERY, Peter Marcelle Project,
Elaine de kooning




Eric Dever

Exhibition :
SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Cloître des Billettes, Paris, Moments Ephémères, 1991.
Hudson River Museum, Hastings on the Hudson, New York, Meditations, 1991.
ARC Gallery, Chicago, La Comédie Humaine, 1994.
Coleman Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1995.
Nicholas Davies Gallery, New York, Le Désert de Retz et Parc Monceau, 1997.
Everything is Everything, Brooklyn, 4 Funerals and 2 Follies, 1998.
Centre d’Art et de Rencontres, Château d’Escueillens, Saint-Just en Bellengard, France, Diamonds and Rust, 2004.
White Room, Soho House, New York, East End Paintings, 2004.
Sara Nightingale Gallery, Water Mill, New York, Perennial Histories, 2005.
Sara Nightingale Gallery, Shelter Island, New York, White Paintings 2007-9, 2009.
Sara Nightingale Gallery, Water Mill, New York, Black as White, 2011.
Sara Nightingale Gallery, Water Mill, New York, s.Ram: Red White and Black Paintings, 2012.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
PS 122, New York, Out of Landscape, 1990.
Art in General, New York, Salon Show, 1992.
Renée Fotouhi Gallery East, East Hampton, New York, 1992.
Catskill Gallery, Catskill, New York, View from Olana: A Survey of Contemporary Landscape Art, 1993.
Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, Scene and Unscene, 1993.
Renée Fotouhi Gallery East, East Hampton, New York, 1993.
Spaces, Cleveland, Ohio, History Painting, 1993.
Coleman Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1994.
ACME Art Co., Columbus, Ohio, 1995.
Renée Fotouhi Gallery East, East Hampton, New York, 1995.
Coleman Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1996.
Coleman Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1997.
Coleman Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1998.
Sculpture Center, New York, 1999.
The Buddy Holly Center, Lubbock, Texas, Y2-Klay, 2000.
Gallery 402, New York, 2001.
Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, New York, 2002.
Gallery 402, New York, 2003.
Mark Borghi Fine Art, Bridgehampton, New York, 2004.
Sara Nightingale Gallery, Water Mill, New York, 2004.
Sara Nightingale Gallery, Water Mill, New Y


Friedel Dzubas




Perle fine
Biography :
Perle Fine was an artist at forefront of the Abstract Expressionist movement as it unfolded in New York and East Hampton, Long Island. Fine studied with Hans Hofmann and was a friend of Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Franz Kline, and other leading artists of the era. She gained recognition after World War II, when she received a grant from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and showed at both Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century Gallery and the Museum of Nonobjective Painting (now the Guggenheim Museum). Her first solo exhibition was held at Willard Gallery, New York, in 1945. Subsequently she showed at Betty Parsons Gallery and the Tanager Gallery, the first New York artist’s cooperative. In 1949, she was one of few women artists invited by de Kooning to join The Club, the intellectual artists’ group that he and Kline led. Less well known than that of some of her male colleagues—in part because she lacked promotional skills—Fine’s work has recently received the attention it has long been due in exhibitions that provide new insight into Abstract Expressionism and in one-artist shows, including a traveling retrospective organized by Hofstra University in 2009. Fine is represented in museums, colleges, and private collections across the country, including Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts; Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock; Ball State Museum of Art, Muncie, Indiana; Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Nashville, Tennessee; Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York; Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; Hofstra University, Long Island, New York; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Indiana University Art Museum, Bloomington; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, Utica, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. Exhibition :
PERLE FINE
Born, 1905 Boston, Massachusetts
Died, 1988 Southampton, New York

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Marian Willard Gallery, New York, 1945

Nierendorf Gallery, New York, 1946

Nierendorf Gallery, New York, 1947
M.H. De Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco, 1947
Betty Parsons Gallery, New York, 1949
Betty Parsons Gallery, New York 1951
Betty Parsons Gallery, New York 1952-3
Tanager Gallery, New York, 1955
Tanager Gallery, New York, 1957
Tanager Gallery, New York, 1958
Tanager Gallery, New York, 1960
Franklin Gallery, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 1961
Robert Keene Gallery, Southampton, New York, 1961
Graham Gallery, New York, 1961,
Graham Gallery, New York, 1963,
Graham Gallery, New York, 1964,
Graham Gallery, New York 1967

Joan Washburn Gallery, New York, 1972

Andre Zarre Gallery, New York, 1973
Hofstra University Museum, Hempstead, New York, 1974
Andre Zarre Gallery, New York, 1976
Andre Zarre Gallery, New York, 1977
Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York, Major Works, 1954–1978: A Selection of Drawings, Paintings, and Collages, 1978.
Ingber Gallery, New York, 1982,
Ingber Gallery, New York, 1984

Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, Perle Fine: Works on Paper, 1997

Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, East Hampton, New York, Perle Fine Collages, 1957–1966, 2005
McCormick Gallery, Chicago, Perle Fine: The Storm Departs, 2007

Hofstra University Museum, Hempstead, New York, Tranquil Power: The Art of Perle Fine, 2009 (traveling exhibition)

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Municipal Art Galleries, New York, 1938

Art of this Century, New York, Spring Salon, 1943
The Museum of Non-Objective Painting (now, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum), 1943
Art of this Century, New York, Spring Salon, 1944
The Museum of Non-Objective Painting (now, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum), 1944
Puma Gallery, New York, 1944

Wittenborn Gallery, New York, 1944

The Museum of Non-Objective Painting (n


Judith Godwin
Biography :
Since the early 1950s, Judith Godwin has been using gesture and color to relate her life experiences in her Abstract Expressionist canvases. Her works have been informed through the dance and choreography of Martha Graham, jazz, nature, and Zen philosophy. Godwin was born in Suffolk, Virginia in the 1930s. After graduating from Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Virginia, Godwin moved to New York and enrolled at the Art Students League in 1953. At the Art Students League she was taught by Will Barnet, Harry Sternberg, and Vaclav Vytlacil. She soon began studying under Hans Hofmann, who introduced her to Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and James Brooks, the two latter forming close friendships with Godwin. By the 1958, Godwin was exhibiting at the respected Stable Gallery Invitational and soon was represented by Betty Parsons Gallery. Judith Godwin has had many important solo exhibitions recently including McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, Texas (2008), Telfair Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia (2011), and Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia (2012 - 13). Judith Godwin’s work is represented in many important collections including Art Institute of Chicago; Greenville County Museum, South Carolina; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, Texas; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Weatherspoon Art Gallery, University of North Carolina, Greensboro; and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.


John Goodyear

Exhibition :
John Goodyear

b. 1930, Los Angeles, California
1952, Bachelor of Design, University of Michigan
1954, Master of Design, University of Michigan
1956-62, Instructor, University of Michigan
1962-64, Instructor, University of Massachusetts, Amerst
1964-97, Professor of Art, Rutgers University, New Jersey

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Amel Gallery, New York City, 1964.
Amel Gallery, New York City, 1965.
Amel Gallery, New York City, e1966.
Douglass College Art Gallery, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1967.
Andrew Dickson White Museum, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 1972.
Everson Museum, Syracuse University, New York, 1972.
Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsylvania, 1972.
Inhibodress Gallery, Sydney, Australia, 1972.
New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, 1975.
Center of Advanced Visual Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1976.
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts, 1976.
Slusser Gallery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1981.
New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, 1981.
Princeton Gallery of Fine Arts, New Jersey, 1987.
Pyramid Gallery, New York City, 1989.
Snyder Fine Art, New York City, 1992.
Jersey City Museum, New Jersey, 1993.
Frank Martin Gallery, Muhlenburg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania, 1995.
Ericson Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2000.
Michener Museum, Doylestwon, Pennsylvania, 2000.
Ben Shahn Galleries, William Paterson University, Wayne, New Jersey, 2001.
Gallery of Fine Art, Newtown, Pennsylvania, 2004.
Hunterdon Museum of Art, Clinton, New Jersey, 2005.
New Jersey Center for the Arts, Summit, New Jersey, 2012.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York City, New Forms-New Media I and II, 1960.
Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, New England Art Today, 1962.
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Faculty Art Exhibition, 1965.
Howard Wise Gallery, New York City, On the Move, 1965.
Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New Y


Gertrude greene
Biography :
Gertrude Greene was born in New York City in 1904 and was known for her abstract wall reliefs and paintings. Along with her husband, Balcomb Greeene, she was one of the founding members of the American Abstract Artists, where she worked to get abstract art accepted by the major New York museums. Many scholars have said that Greene was the first American artist to construct non-objective relief sculptures in the 1930s. These constructions showed a synthesis of Russian Constructivist and Cubist themes. By the 1940s her work was more influenced by artists like Piet Modrian and the Neo-Plasticist movement. By the late 1940s, she had abandoned sculpture in favor of paitnings, although as Jacqulien Moss said in Arts Magazine in 1981, her canvases never lost a “sense of architectural structure.” Gertrude Greene’s work is represented in many public and private collections, including the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania. © Berry Campbell, 2015. Exhibition :
GERTRUDE GREENE

Born, 1904, Brooklyn, New York
1924-26, Leonardo da Vinci School of Art, New York
1926, Married Balcomb Greene
Died, 1956, New York

CHARTER MEMBER
Artist’s Union
Painters and Sculptors Guild
American Abstract Artists
Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Laurel Gallery, New York.
Grace Borgenicht Gallery, New York.
Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York.
A.C.A. Galleries, New York, 1979.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 200 Years of American Sculpture: Bicentennial Exhibition, 1976.
The Downtown Branch of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Advocates of Abstraction, 1976.
The Art Museum of the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, American Abstract Artists, 1977.
Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey, Geometric Abstraction and Related Works, 1979.

MUSEUM COLLECTIONS
Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York.
Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Centre College Regional Arts Center, Danville, Kentucky.
Cincinnati Museum of Art, Ohio.
College Art Collection, Housatonic Community College, Stratford, Connecticut.
Columbus Gallery of Fine Art, Ohio.
Finch College Museum of Art, New York.
Guild Hall, East Hampton, Long Island, New York.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York.
Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska, Lincoln.
Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey.
Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York.
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania.
Rochester Memorial Museum, New York.
Slater Memorial Museum, the Norwich Free Academy, Connecticut.
Telfair Academy of the Arts and Sciences, Savannah, Georgia.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.


Balcomb Greene
Biography :
Balcomb Greene was a one of the leaders of the early American Modernist movement of the 1930s. In 1935, he was included in the ground breaking exhibition, Abstract Painting in America at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Along with Ilya Bolotowsky, Charles Green Shaw and Burgoyne Diller, he founded the American Abstract Artists group in 1936. Balcomb Greene’s pure geometric style of juxtaposing hard edge shapes and lines against planes of color made the 1930s one of the most important periods in American painting, thus leading the way for the Abstract Expressionist painters who followed in the 1950s. Balcomb Greene’s work may be found in most major public collections, including Art Institute of Chicago; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, CT; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. © Berry Campbell, 2015. Exhibition :
1904, born, Millville, New York
1936, received B.A., Syracuse University
1927, studied at Columbia University
1931, studied at the Academie de la Grande Chaurniere, Paris
1943, received M.A., New York University
SELECTED SOLO EXHIBTIONS
lB. Neuman's New Art Circle, New York, 1947.
Arts and Crafts Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1953.
Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, annually 1950-61
American University, Washington, D.C., 1957
Brookhaven National Laboratory, Long Island, New York, 1959
Centre Cultural American, American Embassy, Paris, 1960
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1961
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, 1961
Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1961
Everhart Museum, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1961
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1961
Mouth Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, 1961
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York, 1961
Saidenberg Gallery, New York, annually 1962-5, 1967-8
Feingarten Galleries, Los Angeles, 1963-4
Feingarten Galleries, Chicago, 1963
La Jolla Art Center, California, 1964
University Gallery, University of Florida, 1965
Tampa Art Institute, Florida, 1965
James David Gallery, Coral Gables, Florida, 1965, 1966
Arts and Crafts Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1966
Main Street Galleries, Chicago, 1966
Santa Barbara Musewn of Art, California, 1966
Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona, 1966
Adele Bednarz Galleries, Los Angeles, California, annually, 1966-69; annually, 1971-75
Occidental College, Los Angeles, 1967
Berenson Galleries, Bay Harbor Islands, Florida, annually, 1967-69
Mackler Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1968
Forum Gallery, New York, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1975
Fairweather-Hardin Gallery, Chicago, 1972, 1973
Harmon Gallery, Naples, Florida, annually, 1974-1977, 1979, 1982
Harmon-Meek Gallery, Meek Gallery, Naples, Florida, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1982, 1983,
1985, 1992, 1994
International Oceanographic Institute, Key Biscayne, Florida, 1976
A.C.A.


Also exhibited by: Rosenberg + Co.,
Ken Greenleaf

Exhibition :
SOLO EXHIBITIONS
LoGiudice Gallery, New York, 1973.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1973.
Walter Kelly Gallery, Chicago, 1973.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1974.
Watson/ de Nagy Gallery, Houston, 1974.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1976.
B.R. Kornblatt Gallery, Baltimore, 1977.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1978.
Barridoff Gallery, Portland, Maine, 1980.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1980.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1981.
Harry Lebau Jewish Center, Union, New Jersey, Monumental Sculpture Series, 1983.
Sculptor’s Guild Outdoors, New York, 1985.
John Davis Gallery, New York, 1987.
John Davis Gallery, New York, 1989.
Stark Gallery, New York, 1990.
Gleason Fine Art, Boothbay Harbor, Maine, 1992.
Stark Gallery, New York, 1992.
O’Farrell Gallery, Brunswick, Maine, 1994.
Gold/Smith Gallery, Charcoal Drawing, Boothbay Harbor, Maine, 2009.
Caldbeck Gallery, Rockland, Maine, 2010.
June Fitzpatrick Gallery, Portland, Maine, Drawing the Line, 2011.
Center for Contemporary Art, Rockport, Maine, Intercept, 2012.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
The Art Institute of Chicago, 1972.
LoGiudice Gallery, New York, 1972.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Biennial: Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture, 1973.
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana, Painting and Sculpture Today, 1974.
The Museum of Fine Art, Houston, Geometry, 1974.
South Houston Gallery, New York, American International Sculpture Symposium, 1974.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Recent Acquisitions, 1974.
Sculpture Now Gallery, New York, 1975.
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana, Painting and Sculpture Today, 1976.
Maine Coast Artists, Rockport, Maine, 1976.
Water Street Gallery, Damariscotta, Maine, 1977.
Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina, Selected Works from the Tibor de Nagy Gallery, 1978.
Weatherspoon Gallery, Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York, Art on Paper, 1978.
Nassau Museum of Fine Art, Port Washington, New York, Sculpture at


Raymond Hendler
Biography :
A first-generation action painter, Raymond Hendler started his career as an Abstract Expressionist in Paris, as early as 1949. In the years that followed, he played a significant role in the movement, both in New York, where he was a friend of Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, and Jackson Pollock, and in Philadelphia, where he ran an avant-garde gallery between 1952 and 1954. His work evolved from overall tightly-wound linear webs to abstract pictograms that blend a personal language with hints at figuration. Of the latter works Kline, remarked in 1961: “The direct austere design and color complexes paint the image without undue nuances—with clarity and mature independence.” Hendler studied in his native Philadelphia, at the Graphic Sketch Club, the Philadelphia College of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of Art, and the Tyler School of Art (Temple University). In 1949, he traveled to Paris, where he continued his training at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière on the G.I. Bill. Immersing himself in the Left Bank art scene, he formed close friendships with the Canadian Taschist painter, Jean Paul Riopelle, and the noted Australian sculptor, Robert Klippel. In Paris, he exhibited at the Musée d’Art Moderne and was a founding member of Galerie Huit, the first American cooperative gallery in Europe. Its members included Sam Francis, Sidney Geist, Burt Hasen, Al Held, Shirley Jaffe, Paul Keene, Jules Olitski, Robert Rosenwald, Carmen D'Avino, Haywood Bill Rivers, and Herbert Katzman. Returning to New York in 1951, Hendler became part of the exploding Greenwich Village art scene. He was a voting member of the New York Artist’s Club from 1951 until its end in 1957. He met the leading figures in the New York School, including the painters Pollock, de Kooning, and Philip Guston and the critic Harold Rosenberg. With Kline, he established a friendship that would last throughout the rest of Kline’s life and significantly inform Hendler’s work. During this Exhibition :
1923, Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1998, Died East Hampton, New York
1951, Academie de la Grande Chaumiere, Paris
1954, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Galerie Huit, Paris, 1951.
Dubin Galleries, Philadelphia, 1952.
Hendler Galleries, Philadelphia, 1953.
Moore College of Art, Philadelphia, 1955.
Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minnesota, 1959.
Rose Fried Gallery, New York, 1962.
Rose Fried Gallery, New York, 1964.
Art Gallery, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 1965.
Rose Fried Gallery, New York, 1967.
Gallery 118, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1970.
St. John University, Collegeville, Minnesota, 1974.
Art Lending Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1975.
Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Minnesota, 1976.
Medici-Berenson Gallery, Miami, 1980.
Medici-Berenson Gallery, Miami, 1981.
Marc Miller Gallery, East Hampton, New York, 1996.
Gallery Rood, Eastport, New York, 2000.
Gallery Rood, Eastport, New York, 2001.
Gallery Rood, Eastport, New York, 2002.
Gallery Rood, Eastport, New York, 2003.
Gallery Rood, Eastport, New York, 2004.
Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery, New York, 2008.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Newark Gallery, Invitational, New Jersey, 1949.
Galerie Huit, Paris, 1950.
Musee D’Art Moderne, Invitational, Paris, 1950.
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia, 1952.
Camino Gallery, Invitational, New York, 1953.
Cheltenman Art Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1953.
Stable Gallery, Invitational, New York, 1953.
Art Center of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 1954.
Camino Gallery, Invitational, New York, 1954.
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 1954.
Edmonton Museum of Art, Alberta, Canada, 1955.
March Gallery, Invitational, New York, 1955.
Mercersburg Academy, Pennsylvania, 1955.
Mills College, Oakland, California, 1955.
Pennsylvania Academy of Art, Philadelphia, 1955.
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania, 1955.
Washington County Museum, Hagerstown, Maryland, 1955.
Calgary Allied Art Center, Al


Paul Jenkins

Exhibition :
Born, 1923, Kansas City, Missouri
1937-43, Kansas City Art Institute
1948-52, Art Students League with Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Morris Kantor
Died, 2012, New York, New York

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Studio Paul Facchetti, Paris, 1954.
Zimmergalerie Franck, Frankfort am Main, 1954.
Zoe Dusanne Gallery, Seattle, Washington, 1955.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1956.
Galerie Stadler, Paris, 1957.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1958.
Galerie Stadler, Paris, 1959.
Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1960.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1960.
Esther Robles Gallery, Los Angeles, 1960.
Galerie d’Art Moderne, Stuttgart, 1960.
Galerie Karl Flinker, Paris, 1961.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1961.
University Gallery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1961.
Esther Robles Gallery, Los Angeles, 1962.
Galerie Karl Flinker, Paris, 1962.
Galerie Lienhard, Zurich, 1962.
Galleria Odyssia, Rome, 1962.
Kolnischer Kunstverein, Cologne, 1962.
Toninelli Arte Moderna, Milan, 1962.
Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1963.
Galerie Karl Flinker, Paris, 1963.
Gallery Moos, Toronto, 1963.
American Art Gallery, Copenhagen, 1964.
Kestner-Gesellschaft, Hanover, 1964.
Kumar Gallery, New Delhi, 1964.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1964.
Tokyo Gallery, Tokyo, 1964.
Court Gallery, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1965.
Galerie Karl Flinker, Paris, 1965
Gallery of Modern Art, Scottsdale, 1965.
Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroit, 1965.
Arthur Tooth & Sons, London, 1966.
Galerie Agnes LeFort, Montreal, 1966.
Hope Makler Gallery, Philadelphia, 1966.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1966.
Galerie Daniel Gervis, Paris, 1968.
Gallery Moos, Toronto, 1968.
Galerie Raber, Lucerne, 1968.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1968.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1969.
Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroit, 1970.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1970.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1971.
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 1971.
Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago, 1971.
Abrams Original Edition


Also exhibited by: Peter Marcelle Project, Rosenberg + Co., SPONDER GALLERY,
Wolf KAHN




Jill Nathanson
Biography :
Jill Nathanson is an artist who has worked to reimagine the tradition of Color Field painting. Using a technique of pouring acrylic polymers, Nathanson’s paintings are characterized by coloristic inventiveness, as the pours create new hues by overlapping layers of translucency. Her paintings evoke what she calls “color desire,” as the fluidity of the forms engage us in seeking color resolutions across the pictorial field, while drawing us to the different spaces that the colors occupy and the ways they attract and repel each other. Nathanson became fascinated by color painting at Bennington College. She arrived at the school in the mid-1970s, when it was at the center of color field abstraction. From Kenneth Noland and Larry Poons, she learned to avoid composing through dark and light tones and to give color an ever-greater role in structuring a painting. Over the last four decades, she has deepened her exploration of color dynamics, seeking to transmit affective realities of seeing. She courts chaos in her method, through employing chance, but she also works methodically—each overlay of color takes a day to dry. For the viewer, her paintings evoke energies in the body as well as optical experience, and the physical presence of each painting resists immediate assimilation, involving a dynamic, layered search for unity. After her time at Bennington, Nathanson received her MFA from Hunter College, City University of New York. Her first solo exhibition was held in 1982 at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg. Subsequently she has been featured in one-artist shows at many venues, including Hunter College; Roanoke College, Virginia; the Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art; the Slifka Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut; the Derfner Judaica Museum, New York; and June Kelly Gallery, New York. She has participated in numerous group exhibitions, including Bennington College, Vermont; Stanford Museum, Connecticut; Danfort Exhibition :
EDUCATION

1976, Bennington College
1982, Hunter College, MFA
1982, Triangle Artists Workshop
1992, Triangle Artists Workshop
2007-present Board, Triangle Artists Workshop

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

Berry Campbell, New York, 2015.
Messineo Art Projects/Wyman Contemporary, New York, The Air We Swim In: New Paintings, 2013.
Messineo Art Projects/Wyman Contemporary, New York, No Blue Without Yellow, 2010.
Derfner Judaica Museum, New York, Sacred Presence/Painterly Process, 2010.
Seeing Sinai Collaboration Makom Center for Mindfulness, New York City, 2006.
Slifka Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 2006.
Seeing Sinai Collaboration, New York City, 2006.
Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art, Pennsylvania, Seeing Sinai Collaboration, 2005.
Elizabeth Harris Gallery, New York City, 2002.
Elizabeth Harris Gallery, New York City, 2000.
June Kelly Gallery New Paintings, New York City, 1997.
June Kelly Gallery Paintings:, New York City, 1995.
Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York City, 1987.
Triangle Center Gallery, New York City, 1984.
Hunter College Gallery, New York City, 1982.
Roanoke College, Virginia, 1982.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, 1982.

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

Merton Simpson Gallery, New York, Iconomania, 2014.
Taylor University, Upland, Indiana, Crosscurrents in Contemporary Abstraction, 2012.
National Academy Museum, New York, The Annual, 2012, 2012.
Triangle Gallery, Dumbo, Brooklyn, What Only Paint Can Do, 2012.
Lori Bookstein Fine Art, New York, Karen Wilkin, Curator, Color as Structure/ Structure as Color, 2007.
The Painting Center, New York, Karen Wilkin, Curator, The Legacy of Hans Hofmann, 2006.
Lori Bookstein Fine Art, New York, 2005.
New York Studio School, Painting Abstraction, 2000.
Elizabeth Harris Gallery, New York, Up and Coming, 1999.
Tribes Gallery, New York, Small Gems, 1995.
Shirley Fiterman Gallery, Borough of Manhattan Community College, Michael R. Chilsom, Cu


John Opper




Alfonso Ossorio




Stephen Pace
Biography :
Inspired by his studies with Hans Hofmann, Pace’s work from the 1950s is characterized by dynamic brush strokes, shifting planes of color, and pulsating jagged forms. In a 1959 article from Look magazine, Hofmann referred to Pace as one of his most talented pupils. In 1961, the critic, Thomas B. Hess, called Pace a “brilliant member of the second generation of New York School painters that burst on the scene, in the early 1950s, fully made, as if from the forehead of the Statue of Liberty.” Pace was born in Charleston, Missouri, and spent his youth in Indiana. He received his first training in his teens from a W.P.A. painter. During World War II, he served in the Army, creating views of combat and local scenery and designing posters. He became a frequent visitor to the home of Gertrude Stein while on active duty in Paris. After the war, he studied on the G.I. Bill at the Institute of Fine Art in San Miguel Allende, Mexico, where he became a lifelong friend of Milton Avery. Settling in New York, Pace studied at the Art Students League under Cameron Booth and Morris Kantor as well as Hans Hofmann’s school. Over the course of his career, he taught at many institutions, including American University, Washington, DC; Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, Pratt Institute, New York; University of California, Berkeley, California; and Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. Throughout his career, numerous solo exhibitions of his work were held at museums and galleries. He took part in historic exhibitions at the Stable and Tanager galleries and in important group shows, including annuals at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. © Berry Campbell, 2015 Exhibition :
1918, born Charleston, Missouri
2010, died New Harmony, Indiana

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Meeting Room of Rappite Men’s Dormitory, New Harmony, Indiana, 1939.
Bosse High School, Evansville, Indiana, 1945.
University of Indiana, Bloomington, 1946.
Danforth Memorial Library, Charleston, Missouri, 1948.
Hendler Gallery, Philadelphia, 1953.
Artists Gallery, New York, 1954.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1956.
Poindexter Gallery, New York, 1956.
Poindexter Gallery, New York, 1957.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1958.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1959.
Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1959.
Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco, 1960.
Holland Goldowksy Gallery, Chicago, 1960.
Howard Wise Gallery, Cleveland, Ohio, 1960.
Howard Wise Gallery, New York, 1960.
Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles, Stephen Pace: Paintings, 1961.
The Hayden Gallery, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1961.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1961.
Howard Wise Gallery, New York, 1961.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1962.
Chicago Arts Club, 1962.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1963.
Howard Wise Gallery, New York, 1963.
Howard Wise Gallery, New York, 1965.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1966.
Ridler Gallery, Evansville, Indiana, 1966.
University Art Museum, University of California, Berkeley, 1968.
Graham Gallery, New York, 1969.
Des Moines Art Center, Iowa, 1970.
University of Texas Art Museum, Austin, 1970.
Charlotte Crosby Kemper Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, 1973.
Kansas City Art Institute, Missouri, 1973.
Maine Coast Artists, Rockport, 1973.
A.M. Sachs Gallery, New York, 1974.
College Art Gallery, Drew University, Madison, New Jersey, 1975.
Deer Isle Art Association, Maine, 1975.
Proctor Art Center, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, 1975.
A.M. Sachs Gallery, New York, 1976.
Polo Gallery, Georgetown, Washington, DC, 1976.
Watkins Art Gallery, American University, Washington, DC, 1976.
N


Charlotte park
Biography :
Charlotte Park’s (1918–2010) important contribution to the Abstract Expressionist movement during its early years has recently been acknowledged. Writing in the New York Times, just before Park died in late 2010, Roberta Smith called Park “a natural painter and a gifted colorist,” whose “ascension into the ranks of widely known Abstract Expressionists” was probably too late for her to witness. Overshadowed by the attention given to the work of her husband, James Brooks, Park kept a low profile over the course of her career, while painting some the strongest and most brilliantly colored canvases of her time. Her art is a strong case against the idea prevalent from the 1950s onward that women were incapable of the muscularity and confidence necessary to be action painters. The representation of Park’s estate adds to Berry Campbell’s leading role as a showcase for the work of established and mid-career artists in the modernist tradition. Other estates and artists represented by the gallery include Edward Avedisian, Dan Christensen, Raymond Hendler, Jodie Manasevit, Stephen Pace, Edwin Ruda, Albert Stadler, and Syd Solomon, Susan Vecsey, and James Walsh. Born in Concord, Massachusetts, Park studied from 1935 to 1939 at the Yale School of Fine Art. She met James Brooks while working at the Office of Strategic Services in Washington, D.C. during World War II. The two moved to New York City in 1945, where Park studied privately with the Australian artist Wallace Harrison. Brooks and Park soon became part of the circle of Jackson Pollock and his wife Lee Krasner. They rented a studio space that had been occupied by Pollock and joined Pollock and Krasner, along with other young artists working in new styles, in establishing studios on Long Island. They stayed first in Montauk, but after their studio was destroyed by a hurricane in 1954, they moved to a cottage in Springs, East Hampton, which became their full-time residence. Park initially w


William Perehudoff
Biography :
Throughout his life, the Canadian painter William Perehudoff maintained a close connection with the prairie of Saskatchewan, Canada, where he grew up and established his studio. His art developed from his personal response to the light and color of the Canadian Prairie as well as from historical art and theory. At the same time, his work reflected the present, expressing the literalist perspective of the Color Field movement, epitomized by the idea that the force of painting must reside in its materials. The eldest of four children, William Wassily Perehudoff was born in 1918 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and raised in the Russian Doukhobor colony in rural Bogdanovka, twenty-five miles northwest of Saskatoon,. His parents, who emigrated from Russia in 1899, were part of a wave of spiritual pacifists, who left their homeland to escape from Czarist persecution. By the time he was in his early twenties, Perehudoff had begun to paint, receiving advice from local artists, including Ernst Lindner, known for high-keyed, sharply focused watercolors of the Saskatchewan countryside. Perehudoff began to receive recognition from the press in 1945, when the Saskatoon Star Phoenix described him as one of the most promising artists in the Saskatoon Art Center’s fall exhibition. Having developed a fascination on his own for the art of Mexican muralists, in the summer of 1948, Perehudoff sought instruction at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center with Jean Charlot. From Charlot, Perehudoff learned the age-old technique of fresco painting and developed social realist imagery rendered in the monumental and reductive style of Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco. In 1949, he began what would be a long association with Fred Mendel, the owner of International Packers Ltd., one of Saskatoon’s largest employers and an art collector who would establish a museum in 1964. Perehudoff created murals (ca. 1949) for Mendel’s business and home, portraying figures with a Baroque musc Exhibition :
1918, Born Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
2013, Died Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1948 – 49, Studied at Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado
1950 – 51, Studied at Ozenfant School of Fine Arts, New York
1968, Attended Carnegie Institute of Technology

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Saskatoon Arts Centre, Saskatchewan, 1948.
Saskatoon Arts Centre, Saskatchewan, 1950.
Saskatoon Arts Centre, Saskatchewan, 1961.
Regina Public Library, Saskatchewan, 1961.
The Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1965.
Regina Public Library, Saskatchewan, 1965.
Bonli Gallery, Toronto, 1967.
The Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1970.
Edmonton Art Gallery, Alberta (traveled to Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan), 1971 – 72.
Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 1974.
Saskatoon Public Library, Saskatchewan, 1974.
Theo Waddington Galleries, Montreal, 1974.
Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, 1976.
Waddington-Tooth Gallery, London, 1976.
Theo Waddington Galleries, Montreal, 1977.
Glenbow Alberta Institute, Calgary, 1977 – 78.
Banff Fine Art Centre Gallery, Edmonton, 1978.
Gallery One, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1978.
Meredith Long Contemporary Gallery, New York, 1978.
University of Alberta Art Gallery, Edmonton, 1978.
Waddington Gallery, Toronto, 1978.
Theo Waddington Galleries, Montreal, 1979.
Theo Waddington Gallery, London, 1979.
Downstairs Gallery, Edmonton, Alberta, 1980.
Meredith Long Contemporary Gallery, New York, 1980.
Waddington Gallery, Toronto, 1980.
Canadian Art Galleries, Calgary, Alberta, 1981.
Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (traveled to various locations in Canada), catalogue by Karen Wilkin, 1981 – 83.
Downstairs Gallery, Edmonton, Alberta, 1982.
Waddington Galleries, New York, 1982.
Waddington Shiell Gallery, Toronto, 1982.
The Gallery / Art Placement Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1983.
Waddington Shiell Gallery, Toronto, 1983.
Waddington Shiell Gallery, Toronto, 1985.
Woltjen Udell Gallery, Edmonton, Al


Larry Poons




Ann Purcell

Exhibition :
1971, Independent Study, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
1973, BA, Corcoran School of Art and George Washington University, Washington, DC
1995, MA in Liberal Studies, New York University

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Villa Roma Gallery, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, 1971.
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC, 1976.
Pyramid Galleries, Washington, DC, 1978.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1978.
Dart Gallery, Chicago, 1979.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1980.
Osuna Gallery, Washington, DC, 1981.
Hokin Gallery, Chicago, 1982.
Group Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1983.
Osuna Gallery, Washington, DC, 1983.
Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York, 1983.
Massimo Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1984.
Osuna Gallery, Washington, DC, 1985.
Jack Shainman Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1985.
Reynold C. Kerr Gallery, New York, 1985.
Jack Shainman Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1986.
Philip Dash Gallery, New York, 1986.
Osuna Gallery, Washington, DC, 1987.
Philip Dash Gallery, New York, 1989.
Philip Dash Gallery, New York, 1993.
Philip Dash Gallery, New York, 1997.
Philip Dash Gallery, New York, 1998.
Philip Dash Gallery, New York, 1999.
Hokin Gallery, Palm Beach, Florida, 2001.
Hokin Gallery Bay Harbor Island, Miami, 2002.
Middendorf & Co. Gallery, London, 2002.
Tilghman Gallery, Boca Raton, Florida, 2002.
Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn, 2007.
Osuna Art, Bethesda-Chevy Chase, Maryland, 2008.
Miwa, New York, 2008 – 09.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Misrachi Gallery, Mexico City, 1971.
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Nineteenth Area Exhibition, 1974.
State Department, US Information Agency, Washington, DC, American Embassies in the Middle East, 1974 – 76.
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Corcoran Faculty, 1976.
Gallery #641, Washington, DC, New York/Washington, 1976.
Inland-Foundry Exhibition, Washington, DC, 1976.
Pyramid Galleries, Washington, DC, Two-Person Drawing Exhibit, 1976.
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New


Jon schueler




Syd Solomon
Biography :
SYD SOLOMON (1917–2004) “Solomon offers some exhilarating abstractions based on forms in nature, each shot through with windswept energy of design and color. But the rush of paint is never put to the service of haphazard composition. There is here the kind of thought and control that makes of movement per se an intrinsic element, a necessity that serves as the binding factor of each canvas. Solomon wields a joyous brush that swerves and sweeps its subject matter into dynamic, full-blown rhythmic statements. Their control and discipline lend them real substance.” –John Gruen, New York Magazine, February 16, 1970. An Abstract Expressionist painter of vibrant, multilayered paintings, Syd Solomon held important roles in the art communities of Sarasota, Florida, and East Hampton, New York. Solomon was born near Uniontown, Pennsylvania in 1917. He had a long and varied training as an artist. He began painting in high school in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, where he was an All-American football player. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1935 to 1938. Before the attack on Pearl Harbor, he joined the war effort and soon after married Ann Francine Cohen He was assigned to the 924th Engineer Aviation Regiment of the US Army where he was able to hone his artistic skills by creating camouflage from the air, which protected the airfields being built by the battalion. Working with the artist Barbara Hepworth, he helped camouflage airfields in England, and then was sent to Normandy early in the invasion to provide protective concealment for the ground war. He also designed aerial camouflage for the African campaign. Solomon was considered one of the best camouflage experts in the Army, receiving among other commendations, five bronze stars. Solomon often remarked that this aerial reconnaissance during World War II influenced his ideas about abstract art. At the end of the war, he attended the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Syd Solomon, 19 Exhibition :
b. 1917, Uniontown, Pennsylvania
1935-38, Studied at Art Institute of Chicago

AWARDS
Bronze Star for his contributions in the Battle of the Bulge
1961, Painting of the Year Award, Whitney Museum of Fine Art

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Farnham Castle, Surrey, England, War Drawings, 1944.
Clearwater Museum of Art, Florida, 1951.
Lowe Art Gallery, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, 1953.
Associated American Artists Galleries, New York, 1955.
Florida Gulf Coast Art Center, Clearwater, 1956.
Saidenberg Gallery, New York, 1959.
Safari Gallery, Jerusalem, Israel, 1960.
Tel Aviv Museum, Israel, 1960.
331 Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1960.
Frank H. McChung Museum, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1961.
Sarasota Art Association, Civic Center, Florida, 1961.
Saidenberg Gallery, New York, 1962.
James David Gallery, Ltd., Miami Beach, Florida, 1964.
Group Gallery, Inc., Jacksonville, Florida, 1964.
St. Armands Gallery, Sarasota, Florida, 1966.
James David Gallery, Ltd., Miami Beach Florida, 1966.
Saidenberg Gallery, New York, 1967.
Jacksonville University, Florida, 1968.
Berenson Gallery, Miami, Florida, 1969.
Saidberg Gallery, New York, 1969.
Midtown Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, 1971.
Hokin Gallery, Palm Beach, Florida, 1973.
New York Cultural Center, New York, Retrospective Exhibition, 1973-4.
John and Mabel Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida, Retrospective Exhibition, 1973-4.
Berenson Gallery, Miami, Florida, 1974.
Florida Gulf Coast Art Center, Bellair, 1975.
Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, New York, 1975.
Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, New Works, 1975.
Carone Gallery, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1976.
Tampa Bay Art Center, Florida, 1976.
University of West Florida, Pensacola, Florida, 1977.
Boca Raton Center for the Arts, Florida, Recent Painting, 1977.
Harmon Gallery, Naples, Florida, 1977.
Adley Gallery, Sarasota, Florida, 1978.
Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, Florida, 1978.
Adley Gallery, Sarasota, Flo


Mike Solomon
Biography :
Berry Campbell is pleased to announce its representation of Mike Solomon (b. 1956). Solomon has exhibited widely throughout the United States at museums, galleries, and art fairs and is currently included in the important exhibition, “Defining Abstraction” curated by Mark Ormond at the Ringling College of Art and Design, Sarasota, Florida. Commenting on a 2012 solo exhibition at Salomon Contemporary, New York, Helen Harrison stated, "His art embodies fundamental qualities that he perceives in nature, for which he creates aesthetic analogies. Without imitating those qualities he captures their essence, pins it down and offers it as a gift to those who take the time to receive it.” Solomon studied at the Skowhegan School of Sculpture and Painting in Maine (1975) and continued his studies at the Yale Summer School of Music and Art, Norfolk, Connecticut (1978). He spent the rest of 1978 in New York City studying independently with noted artists Ray Parker and David Budd. In 1979, Solomon earned his Bachelor of Arts at the College of Creative Studies at the University of California Santa Barbara where he studied with Charles Garabedian and John McCracken. Additionally, he served as studio assistant to John Chamberlain, James Brooks, Charlotte Park and Alfonso Ossorio. In 1989, Solomon earned his Masters of Fine Art at Hunter College, New York. Mike Solomon became fascinated with the grid early in his career and it continues to be a central structural element in his paintings and sculpture. Janet Goleas wrote that Solomon’s grids are reductive aesthetically, but not without emotion, “And so, contained in Solomon's grid work are the moments, memories and the small poetries that function at the edges of actuality. That subtle piercing into the fabric of memory is one of the mainstays of his oeuvre.” Through the years, as Solomon has explored various subjects and used materials such as roplex, acrylic and beeswax, a consistent through-line has been his Exhibition :
1975, Skowhegan School of Sculpture and Painting, Skowhegan, Maine
1978, Yale Summer School of Music and Art, Norfolk, Connecticut
1978, Independent study with Ray Parker and David Budd, New York, New York
1979, Bachelor of Arts, College of Creative Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara, California
1989 Masters of Fine Art, Hunter College, New York, New York

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Kathryn Markel Fine Art, Bridgehampton, NY, 2015
Alfstad & Contemporary, Sarasota, FL, 2015
Allyn Gallup Contemporary, Sarasota, FL, 2014
Salomon Contemporary, New York, NY, 2012
Salomon Contemporary, East Hampton, NY, 2008
John McWhinnie at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, East Hampton, NY, 2008
Salomon Contemporary, East Hampton, NY, 2006
Greene Contemporary, Sarasota, FL, 2006
The Green Barn, Sagaponack, NY, 2002
Heckscher Museum of Art, Roslyn, NY, 1999
Ann Harper Gallery, Amagansett, NY, 1996
Benton Gallery, Southampton, NY, 1993
Benton Gallery, Southampton, NY, 1992
Hunter College, New York, NY, 1989
Queens Museum of Art, Queens, NY, 1988
Vered Gallery, East Hampton, NY, 1986
University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, 1979

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Ringling College of Art and Design, Selby Gallery, Sarasota, FL, “Defining Abstraction,” July 10 – August 5, 2015
Allyn Gallup Contemporary, Sarasota, FL, “The Lightness of Being: Abstracts: Part 1,” May 1-June 13, 2015
Sara Nightingale Fine Art, Water Mill, NY, 2015
Hamptons Art Markt, Sara Nightingale Fine Art, Bridgehampton, NY, 2015
Allyn Gallup Contemporary, Sarasota, FL, “A Few Great, Big Pictures,” May 16-July 28, 2014
McNeill Art Group, Southampton, NY, “Mark Makers,” July 4- August 4, 2014
Dallas Art Fair, Ashley Tatum Fine Art, Dallas, TX, 2013
Allyn Gallup Contemporary, Sarasota, FL "Some Wonderful Abstractions," August 15- October 5, 2013
Devil's Heaven: The 20th Annual Watermill Center Benefit, Water Mill, NY, July 27, 2013
Hamptons Art Markt, Sara Nighti


Albert Stadler
Biography :
A leading figure in the rise of color abstraction in the mid-1960s, Albert Stadler addressed the nature of optical experience in his art. In the catalogue for his first solo exhibition, held at Bennington College in 1962, he stated that he saw his canvases as invitations “for the viewer to participate in events, in the activity of color and the relativity of space.” For Stadler, “space . . . and the freedom of the eye to roam” were essential. He enhanced this experience in his art through “deliberate variations.” These were intended “to illuminate and elucidate all parts of a painting,” while allowing viewers the opportunity to find their own way through an image. In an era when artists often intended their paintings to be seen only from a distance, Stadler gave an old master attention to the entirety of his surfaces, enabling them to be read with equal appreciation at close and far ranges. Creating both hard-edge and more ethereal paintings, Stadler united directions in Color Field and Minimalist art, often bridging the gap between the intellectual and sensual and the conceptual and spiritual. Representing Stadler’s estate, Berry-Campbell is pleased to bring this significant body of work to light. Born in New York City, Stadler attended the University of Pennsylvania and received his BFA from the University of Florida, Gainesville, in 1950. His first solo exhibition was held in 1962 at Bennington College, Vermont; it was among the important shows of modernist art organized at the college by art department director Paul Feeley (David Smith, Adolph Gottlieb, and Hans Hoffman were other artists whose work was showcased at Bennington under Feeley’s leadership). The Bennington Banner reported on September 26 that, consisting of canvases of varying sizes by “a young painter from New York,” Stadler’s show provided “visual pleasure [and] sensuous stimulation . . . if one can let the eye enjoy what it sees.” In 1964, Stadler was included Exhibition :
b. 1923, New York City
1942, Undergraduate, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
1946-50, Bachelor of Fine Art, University of Florida, Gainesville
1950, Teaching Assistant, University of Florida, Gainesville
1982-84, Adjunct Professor, Hunter College, New York
1985, Visiting Professor, Hunter College, New York

AWARDS
1968, Guggenheim Fellow
1980, Purchase Award, National Print Exhibition, Trenton State College, New Jersey
1981, Andrew/Nelson/Whitehead Award, The Print Club 56 Annual, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Bennington College, Vermont, 1962.
Kasmin Ltd., London, England, 1964.
Pointexter Gallery, New York City, 1964.
Pointexter Gallery, New York City, 1965.
Kasmin Ltd., London, England, 1966.
Pointexter Gallery, New York City, 1968.
Pointexter Gallery, New York City, 1970.
Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroid, Michigan, 1972.
Pyramid Gallery, Washington, DC, 1972.
Fishbach Gallery, New York City, 1973.
Pointexter Gallery, New York City, 1974.
Pointexter Gallery, New York City, 1975.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Gallery of Modern Art, Washington, DC, 1964.
Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, Ohio, 1964.
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California, Post Painterly Abstraction, 1964.
Contemporary Arts Museum of Houston, Texas, Dealer’s Choice: An Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings, and Prints, 1964.
Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois, 1965.
Detroit Institute of Art, Michigan, Color, Image, and Form, 1967.
Whitney Museum of Art, New York City, Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, 1967.
The White House, Washington, DC, The White House Arts Program, 1967-70.
Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York, Color and Field, 1970.
University Art Museum, University of Texas, Austin, Color Form, 1971.
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, 1973.
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, 1975.
The Brooklyn


Yvonne Thomas




Artist's Documents: N/A  
Susan Vecsey

Exhibition :
Born 1971, Somerville, NJ.
Lives and works in New York City and East Hampton, NY.

EDUCATION

MFA New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting & Sculpture.
Study with Graham Nickson.
BA Barnard College, Columbia University.
Continuing Study MoMA, The New School, International Center of Photography.


SOLO EXHIBITIONS and SELECTED TWO OR FOUR PERSON EXHIBITIONS

2014 Berry Campbell Gallery. New York, NY. Dates TBA. 2010 Spanierman Gallery. “Susan Vecsey, Recent Paintings”. New York, NY.2009 Spanierman Gallery. "Light of Spring”, featuring artists Priscilla Bowden, Deborah Black, Ty Stroudsburg, Susan Vecsey. 2008 Ashawagh Hall. “Susan Vecsey, New Paintings”. East Hampton, NY.


SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS:

2014 Guild Hall Museum. "75th Annual Guild Hall Artist Members Exhibition". East Hampton, NY.
2013 Spanierman Modern. "Modern Selections". New York, NY. Guild Hall Museum. “First Impressions: Printmaking with Solarplates”. East Hampton, NY. Guild Hall Museum. “Landscape Selections from the Permanent Collection”. East Hampton, NY. Spanierman Gallery. “Summer Selections”. New York, NY. Holiday House Hamptons, “Great Room”, by Mabley Handler Design. Bridgehampton, NY. Guild Hall Museum. "75th Annual Guild Hall Artist Members Exhibition". East Hampton, NY. Spanierman Modern, “Dripping! Pouring! Staining!”.
Spanierman Gallery, “Landscapes: 1880s to the Present”. New York, NY. Spanierman Modern, “Thirteen Contemporary Artists”. New York, NY.
2012 Spanierman Gallery, "Summer Selections". New York, NY. Spanierman Gallery, "Modern and Contemporary Paintings". New York, NY. Spanierman Gallery, "Artists of the East End: Past & Present". New York, NY. Guild Hall Museum. "74th Annual Guild Hall Artist Members Exhibition". East Hampton, NY. Spanierman Gallery, "Contemporary Artists". New York, NY.
2011 Spanierman Gallery. "Artists of the East End, Part 2". New York, NY. Ash


James Walsh

Exhibition :
b. 1954, Newark, New Jersey
1976, BA, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
1980, MFA, Syracuse University, New York

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Galeria Joan Prats, New York, 1985.
Galeria Joan Prats, New York, 1988.
Flowers East Gallery, London, 1991.
The Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1997.
Long Fine Art, New York, 2001.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS
Corning Glass Center, Corning, New York, 11th Annual Southern Tier Show, 1974.
Newark Museum, New Jersey, 1st Biennial, New Jersey Artists, 1977.
Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, Utica, New York, 42nd Annual Exhibition of Artists of Central New York, 1979.
Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York, The Syracuse Show, 1980.
The Clayworks Studio Workshop, New York, Work from 1980, 1981.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, New York Clay, 1981.
Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York (traveled to James Yaw Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan; Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Meyer Breier Weiss Gallery, San Francisco; Adelle Taylor Fine Art, Dallas, Texas; Clayworks Studio Workshop, New York), New Yorks in Clay III, 1981 – 82.
Sculpture Center, New York, East Coast Clay, 1982.
Galeria Joan Prats, Barcelona (traveled to Galeria Joan Prats, New York), Five American Artists, 1983 – 84.
Edmonton Art Gallery, Alberta, Canada, 1985.
Galeria Joan Prats, New York, Another Dimension, 1985.
Richard Brush Art Gallery, St. Lawrence University, New York, Pre-Post Modern: Good Art in the Art of Our Time Canton, 1985.
Greene Street Gallery, New York, Triangle – New York, 1986.
Jerusalem Gallery, New York, New Modernists, 1986.
Ted Greenwald Gallery, New York, Retinal Visions, 1987.
Associated American Artists, New York, New Painting, 1990.
Flowers East, London, Small Is Beautiful – Abstract, 1991.
Flowers East, London, 1992.
Doug Udell Gallery, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Group Exhibition, 1998.
55 Mercer, New York, Abstract Eight, 1999.
Long Fine Art, New York, The Painting Aesthetic, 1


Also exhibited by: SPONDER GALLERY,
Joyce Weinstein




Larry Zox
Biography :
Larry Zox was born in Des Moines, Iowa in 1937. He studied at the University of Oklahoma, Drake University and the Des Moines Art Center under George Grosz. In 1958 he moved to New York in 1958 and began making painted collages in which pieces of paper were stapled onto jointed sheets of plywood. His earliest works, completed from 1959 to 1962, were painted collages consisting of painted pieces of paper stapled onto joined sheets of plywood. The paintings that followed were similar in appearance to his collages but painted with straight and later ragged edges. His first one-man exhibition was at the Kornblee Gallery, New York in 1964. His tendency in the late 1960s to use a large central area of colour led to paintings in the 1970s with soft, uneven washes of color and narrow, irregular color borders. Zox won numerous national awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1967. His Work has been included in many solo and group exhibitions including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, among others. His work is held in many publications including the Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York; the Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Tate Modern, London; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. © Berry Campbell, New York Exhibition :
1937, born, Des Moines, Iowa
2006, died, Colchester, Connecticut
1955, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
1956, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa
1956, Des Moines Art Center (studied with Geoge Grosz)

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
Kornblee Gallery, New York, 1962
Kornblee Gallery, New York, 1964
Kornblee Gallery, New York, 1965
Kornblee Gallery, New York, 1966
JL Hudson Gallery, Detroit, Michigan, 1967
Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, 1968
Galerie Rolf Ricke, Cologne, Germany, 1968
Kornblee Gallery, New York, 1968
Kornblee Gallery, New York, 1969
Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, 1970
Akron Art Institute, Ohio, 1971
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1973
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1973
Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa, 1974
Janie C. Lee Gallery, Dallas, Texas, 1974
Rush Rhees Gallery, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, 1974
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1975
Daniel Templeton Gallery, Paris, 1975
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1976
Medici-Berenson Gallery, Bay Harbor Islands, Florida, 1978
Allen Rubiner Gallery, Royal Oak, Michigan, 1979
Ivory/Kimpton Gallery, San Francisco, California, 1981
Hokin Gallery, Palm Beach, Florida, 1981
Meredith Long & Co., Houston, Texas, 1981
Salander-O’Reilly Gallery, New York, 1982
Rubiner Gallery, West Bloomfield, Michigan, 1985
Images Gallery, Toledo, Ohio, 1986
Percival Gallery, Des Moines Iowa 1987
Percival Gallery, Des Moines Iowa, 1989
Images Gallery, Toledo, Ohio, 1990
Rubiner Gallery, West Bloomfield, Michigan, 1990
Gallery One, Toronto, Canada, 1991
Percival Gallery, Des Moines, Iowa, 1991
Robert Stein Gallery, St. Louis, Missouri, 1992
Harnett Museum of Art, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia, 1993
CS Shulte Gallery, Millburn, New Jersey, 1994
Percival Gallery, Des Moines, Iowa, 1995
Percival Gallery, Des Moines, Iowa, 2000
Olson Larsen Gallery, Des Moines, Iowa, 2002
Olson Larsen Gallery, Des Moi


Larry Zox
Biography :
A painter who played an essential role in the Color Field discourse of the 1960s and 1970s, Larry Zox is best known for his intensely and brilliantly colored geometric abstractions, which question and violate symmetry. Zox stated in 1965: “Being contrary is the only way I can get at anything.” To Zox, this position was not necessarily arbitrary, but instead meant “responding to something in an examination of it [such as] using a mechanical format with X number of possibilities.” What he sought was to “get at the specific character and quality of each painting in and for itself,” as James Monte stated in his introductory essay in the catalogue for Zox’s 1973–74 solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Zox also at times used a freer, more intuitive method, while maintaining coloristic autonomy, which became increasingly important to him in his later career. Zox began to receive attention in the 1960s, when he was included in several groundbreaking exhibitions of Color Field and Minimalist art, including Shape and Structure (1965), organized by Henry Geldzahler and Frank Stella for Tibor de Nagy, New York, and Systemic Painting (1966), organized by Lawrence Alloway for the Guggenheim Museum. In 1973–74, the Whitney’s solo exhibition of Zox’s work gave recognition to his significance in the art scene of the preceding decade. In the following year, he was represented in the inaugural exhibition of the Hirshhorn Museum, which acquired fourteen of his works. Zox was born in Des Moines, Iowa. He attended the University of Oklahoma and Drake University, and then studied under George Grosz at the Des Moines Art Center. In 1958, Zox moved to New York, joining the downtown art scene. His studio on 20th Street became a gathering place for artists, jazz musicians, bikers, and boxers. He occasionally sparred with visiting fighters. He later established a studio in East Hampton, a former black smithy used previously by Jackson Pollock


ABOUT

BERRY CAMPBELL features Post-War Modern and Contemporary art
Martha Campbell   Owner
Christine Berry   Owner
Berry Campbell features Post-War Modern and Contemporary art including Edward Avedisian, Walter Darby Bannard, Stanley Boxer, Dan Christensen, Eric Dever, Perle Fine, John Goodyear, Balcomb Greene, Gertrude Greene, Ken Greenleaf, Raymond Hendler, Jill Nathanson, Stephen Pace, Charlotte Park, William Perehudoff, Ann Purcell, Mike Solomon, Syd Solomon, Albert Stadler, James Walsh, Joyce Weinstein, Larry Zox.
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